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mckeown_abstract [2012/11/08 13:52]
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mckeown_abstract [2012/12/23 09:41] (current)
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 **Kathleen McKeown, Columbia University** **Kathleen McKeown, Columbia University**
 //Penn Discourse Treebank Relations and their Potential for Language Generation//​ //Penn Discourse Treebank Relations and their Potential for Language Generation//​
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 +({{:​coling_2012_adaca_pdtb_mckeown.pdf|presentation}})
  
 In the early eighties, language generation researchers explored the use of rhetorical relations, in the form of schemata or common patterns of rhetorical structure (McKeown 85) and later in the form of rhetorical structure theory (RST) (Mann 84).  Researchers in language generation showed how discourse structure could be used to plan the content of a text (McKeown 85, Moore and Paris 93, Hovy 88). In most cases, structure was linked in some way to content, whether directly or through planning how to satisfy speaker intentions, and this was critical to the success of using discourse structure for content planning. Later work (Barzilay 2010, Barzilay and Lapata 2005) took a modern approach to this problem, developing techniques to learn common discourse structures for specific domains and using these learned discourse structures to control content selection and organization. ​ In the early eighties, language generation researchers explored the use of rhetorical relations, in the form of schemata or common patterns of rhetorical structure (McKeown 85) and later in the form of rhetorical structure theory (RST) (Mann 84).  Researchers in language generation showed how discourse structure could be used to plan the content of a text (McKeown 85, Moore and Paris 93, Hovy 88). In most cases, structure was linked in some way to content, whether directly or through planning how to satisfy speaker intentions, and this was critical to the success of using discourse structure for content planning. Later work (Barzilay 2010, Barzilay and Lapata 2005) took a modern approach to this problem, developing techniques to learn common discourse structures for specific domains and using these learned discourse structures to control content selection and organization. ​

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